Tag Archives: Back to School

Winter Break: Back to School Transition

The first week of January is over and for most children, this means that winter break is over too. After almost two luxurious weeks off, it may be hard to transition back into “school mode.” However, just like resolutions, after winter break can be a great time to re-establish a better work ethic and more organized routine for children. TodaysTHV.com had many suggestions for helping children transition from their winter break.

One possibility when getting used to going back to school can be sitting down with your kids and creating a morning routine and an evening routine. Ask them what they think the most important thing is that they need to do in the morning and at night. Working on this routine together can help a child readjust better instead of being forced into a routine they may not agree with.

In addition to working on a routine together, try to make small steps toward this organized routine. The first few days of going back to school may not be easy. If both you and your child keep calm, the morning and nights may go a lot easier.

Another great advantage to a New Year beginning is explaining what resolutions are to children. Although they may not have a list of resolutions, it may be fun to create a list of goals that your children would like to complete during 2013. One goal could be finishing their homework before dinner or eating everything on their dinner plate for a week straight. Come up with fun yet challenging goals that the kids will enjoy.

Also, while the transition back to school is occurring, it may be nice to continuously tell your kids that you are always here to help and if they are struggling with anything, to please let you know right away. Problems that your children are having at home or at school can sometimes be handled faster if children feel comfortable knowing that you are open to hearing how they feel and that you will always lend a helping hand.

Good luck with the transition of back to school! What suggestions do you have for making the transition easier?

In Honor of Back to School: Site Wide Shipping Sale

 

For 6 days only, Step2 is having a site wide shipping sale. Shipping is $2.99 or less! There are new fall products and other favorite items to choose from!

*Site wide shipping $2.99 or less promotion valid now through Sunday, August 26, 2012 at 11:59 PM ET. Valid on all Step2 items shipping to the 48 contiguous US states. Not valid on Infantino items or Canadian shipments. Regular shipping prices resume Monday, August 27 at 12:00 AM ET.

 

Preschool Jitters

As we finish up the last days of summer and transition into back to school time. Are you ready? Most importantly is your child ready? They may have all their school supplies in order, and their bedtime routine may no longer be a hassle but are the mentally ready? Your child might have concerns about beginning preschool. Here are some important ways to prepare your child for school according to BabyCenter.com:

Get your child talking: Encourage your child to voice their concerns about going to preschool. Sometimes, children may not want to talk about the situation which has not yet occurred. However, you can try to play games with your child to show them what they will be during when they are in preschool.

You can also set an example by gently telling them about your own fears: “Sometimes I feel scared when I meet a new person, but I try to be brave and say ‘hi’ anyway.”

Don’t minimize their feelings. It’s natural to want to comfort your child by telling them not to worry, but it is easier said than done. This may intimidate them because if they do begin to worry, they may believe they are doing something wrong.

Instead, sympathize with your child. Talk about the first time you went to a new school and how it was. Be honest with them about how you felt. Ask your child what you can do to help ease their worries.

We also found some more tips from ModernMom.com:

Play up the Fun: Get them excited about starting school. Say thrilling statements like, “There will be a ton of toys to play with at preschool!” or “You will get to sing songs, learn new things, and play games all day. How cool!” By giving them a concrete idea of what they’ll be doing, you are easing their fears of the unknown.

“Mommy, Don’t Leave Me”: Uh-oh, the frightful words that may even make you cry. Most kids will cry the first couple morning that they start preschool. However, be brave; set an example for your child. Use encouraging words to coax them through the morning. It is important to reassure your child that you will see them at the end of the day.

What are your suggestions for relieving the preschool jitters?

Conquering the Bedtime Battle

Sometimes getting the kids to bed is not as easy as parents would like it to be. Summer is coming to an end and that means that a routine bedtime will become a part of a preschooler’s schedule. In Step2’s last blog, Back to School Tips for Preschoolers, it was suggested that if your child has fallen out of a bedtime routine, it is essential to begin getting back on track before school begins. However, that is easier said than done.

Here are some great tips from Parenthood.com to help ease the struggle and win the bedtime battle!

1. Deal with your own stress and emotions before you begin the bedtime routine. This is a great idea! By relaxing and calming down before the potential battle may begin, it is a good to take a step back and assess how you will handle the bedtime situation. Children may resist going to sleep if they are being yelled at. The calmer a parent is, the less resistant a child will be.

2. Ease the transition to bed for your children. Warn your children ahead of time that bedtime is coming up. You do not want to completely drag them away from the television or playtime. Participating in bedtime tasks earlier on in the night may ease the transition and not surprise children that it is time for bed. Having them brush their teeth after dinner or putting on their pajamas (which means no more outdoor play!) an hour before bed limits them to what they can do to try to delay their bedtime.

3. Negotiate rules with your children. Let your children help create the rules for bedtime. However, make sure to stand your ground! Talk about the benefits of going to sleep at a good time on the weekdays so that they can have special rewards of staying up later on the weekends.

4. Create an environment that fosters sleep. If your child has toys all over their room before bedtime, they are more likely to want to continue to play and become easily distracted. Make sure a child’s toys are put away in toy chests. Also, make sure you have a good book to read to them to help them focus on going to sleep.

5. Don’t sweat the small stuff. Some days are going to be harder than others to get a child to sleep. If they are 15 minutes late for their bed time, do not stress out. However, make sure to emphasize that a bedtime routine is important to your little ones!

Back to School Tips for Preschoolers

As the summer winds down and school starts back up, it is hard to transition from summer to back to school. Hopefully, your little ones have had an excellent summer. Now it is time to change gears and make sure that they are prepared for back to school.

Parentsfurther.com has provided ten back to school tips that will make the transition a little easier for both you and your children.

Here are the top five tips, Step2 believed were the most helpful:

1. If you and your child have fallen out of your bedtime routine this summer, get back into a solid routine. A week before the first day of school is a good time frame in which to begin.

2. Plan and shop for healthy breakfasts and lunches a week in advance. This will save you precious time and prevent much stress in the long run!

3. Accidents happen! Prepare a change of clothes in advance, and bring it with you on the first day of school for your child’s teacher to keep in the classroom.

4. If possible, arrange play dates with other parents of preschoolers, or find out if your local library or community center offers free events for young children. Spending time with other children will help your child’s social and emotional development and prepare her for the school environment.

5. Parents’ involvement in school is important—even in preschool! Talk to your child’s preschool teacher (or child-care provider) regularly about his educational and social development.

In addition to the tips that Parentsfurther.com had, Step2 suggests promoting creativity within children. For the next couple weeks, encouraging your child to use their desks and easels would help support the back to school transition as well!