Tag Archives: bedtime

We’re Moms Too: Bed Bugs & Much Ado about Bedtime

Moms Too Button Bed Bugs
 

Written by Sara S.

My husband has been working nights for the past few weeks. It took a bit of time for the kids and I to get used to it.  Meanwhile, they began sneaking into my bed during the night… knowing that I have been too tired to kick them out.

Ryan started coming into my bed in the middle of the night and I wouldn’t notice it or I would be too tired to send him back to his own room.  For goodness sake, there is plenty of room in the king bed for me and a five year old.  But that’s where I was wrong.

Somehow Grizz started coming in too. I thought it was Ryan because Brady never would get out of his bed at night without calling out  – “Mommy where are you?”  Mommy where are you?” I am pretty sure that meant – “Mommy come get me or Mommy come here.” Grizz has a phobia that adds disruption to sleep.  He won’t put his feet under the covers because he is convinced there might be spiders lurking under there waiting to bite his feet; so the safest place for his feet is on top of the covers.

The bedtime visits have escalated and now I have two bed bugs. One comes in around 1am and the other one stumbles in sometime later. I woke up the other morning to Brady sleeping with his feet in Ryan’s face.  Both fast asleep.

bed bugs
 

I think it’s time for them to share a room. At least then they can crawl into bed with each other.

I remember crawling into bed with my parents. It was the safest and happiest feeling. If they said “no,” and sent me back to my room I remember feeling so sad and scared. Those memories make it harder for me to be stern with my own kids and send them marching back into their own cold and dark rooms.

I will be strong when Chris is done working nights and we can enforce the kids sleeping in their own beds!

Any ideas?

 
Sara is an on the go – down to earth Momma, married to a Marine and the mother of two get dirty wild and crazy, play in the mud boys. She loves Michael Jackson, dancing and spending time with her family. She is honored to be able to teach her little guys about the world around them, about kindness love and the human spirit. For fun, she loves to make jewelry, shop, ski and spend time outdoors getting dirty with her boys. Sara is a Sr. Product Manager at Step2.

Preschool Jitters

As we finish up the last days of summer and transition into back to school time. Are you ready? Most importantly is your child ready? They may have all their school supplies in order, and their bedtime routine may no longer be a hassle but are the mentally ready? Your child might have concerns about beginning preschool. Here are some important ways to prepare your child for school according to BabyCenter.com:

Get your child talking: Encourage your child to voice their concerns about going to preschool. Sometimes, children may not want to talk about the situation which has not yet occurred. However, you can try to play games with your child to show them what they will be during when they are in preschool.

You can also set an example by gently telling them about your own fears: “Sometimes I feel scared when I meet a new person, but I try to be brave and say ‘hi’ anyway.”

Don’t minimize their feelings. It’s natural to want to comfort your child by telling them not to worry, but it is easier said than done. This may intimidate them because if they do begin to worry, they may believe they are doing something wrong.

Instead, sympathize with your child. Talk about the first time you went to a new school and how it was. Be honest with them about how you felt. Ask your child what you can do to help ease their worries.

We also found some more tips from ModernMom.com:

Play up the Fun: Get them excited about starting school. Say thrilling statements like, “There will be a ton of toys to play with at preschool!” or “You will get to sing songs, learn new things, and play games all day. How cool!” By giving them a concrete idea of what they’ll be doing, you are easing their fears of the unknown.

“Mommy, Don’t Leave Me”: Uh-oh, the frightful words that may even make you cry. Most kids will cry the first couple morning that they start preschool. However, be brave; set an example for your child. Use encouraging words to coax them through the morning. It is important to reassure your child that you will see them at the end of the day.

What are your suggestions for relieving the preschool jitters?

Conquering the Bedtime Battle

Sometimes getting the kids to bed is not as easy as parents would like it to be. Summer is coming to an end and that means that a routine bedtime will become a part of a preschooler’s schedule. In Step2’s last blog, Back to School Tips for Preschoolers, it was suggested that if your child has fallen out of a bedtime routine, it is essential to begin getting back on track before school begins. However, that is easier said than done.

Here are some great tips from Parenthood.com to help ease the struggle and win the bedtime battle!

1. Deal with your own stress and emotions before you begin the bedtime routine. This is a great idea! By relaxing and calming down before the potential battle may begin, it is a good to take a step back and assess how you will handle the bedtime situation. Children may resist going to sleep if they are being yelled at. The calmer a parent is, the less resistant a child will be.

2. Ease the transition to bed for your children. Warn your children ahead of time that bedtime is coming up. You do not want to completely drag them away from the television or playtime. Participating in bedtime tasks earlier on in the night may ease the transition and not surprise children that it is time for bed. Having them brush their teeth after dinner or putting on their pajamas (which means no more outdoor play!) an hour before bed limits them to what they can do to try to delay their bedtime.

3. Negotiate rules with your children. Let your children help create the rules for bedtime. However, make sure to stand your ground! Talk about the benefits of going to sleep at a good time on the weekdays so that they can have special rewards of staying up later on the weekends.

4. Create an environment that fosters sleep. If your child has toys all over their room before bedtime, they are more likely to want to continue to play and become easily distracted. Make sure a child’s toys are put away in toy chests. Also, make sure you have a good book to read to them to help them focus on going to sleep.

5. Don’t sweat the small stuff. Some days are going to be harder than others to get a child to sleep. If they are 15 minutes late for their bed time, do not stress out. However, make sure to emphasize that a bedtime routine is important to your little ones!